Our leadership

Hubert Pelletier joined the Nature Conservancy of Canada in 2002. He is now the Director of Conservation in Québec, and in this role collaborates with a multidisciplinary team of 30 people to protect sensitive natural areas in “la belle province.” 

As part of his duties, Hubert develops and implements a wide range of strategies for conserving natural spaces on private lands, always with an eye to meeting the individual needs of each landowner. He works in close collaboration with scientists, local communities, municipalities, landowners, organizations, and the federal and provincial governments. 

Hubert is an environmental geographer by training (McGill 2001), and is constantly looking for ways to enhance the coexistence of humans and nature. He is passionate about mountainous landscapes and has traveled extensively in the Andes, Himalayas, Rockies, and Alps. Through his work as a project manager in Latin America, he has broad experience working with international organizations. 

In his spare time, Hubert is an avid river canoer, skier, cyclist, and hiker.

Hubert Pelletier-Gilbert, Nature Conservancy of Canada Québec Region

Hubert Pelletier joined the Nature Conservancy of Canada in 2002. He is now the Director of Conservation in Québec, and in this role collaborates with a multidisciplinary team of 30 people to protect sensitive natural areas in “la belle province.” As part of his duties, Hubert develops and implements a wide range of strategies for conserving natural spaces on private lands, always with an eye to meeting the individual needs of each landowner. He works in close collaboration with scientists, local communities, municipalities, landowners, organizations, and the federal and provincial governments. Hubert is an environmental geographer by training (McGill 2001), and is constantly looking for ways to enhance the coexistence of humans and nature. He is passionate about mountainous landscapes and has traveled extensively in the Andes, Himalayas, Rockies, and Alps. Through his work as a project manager in Latin America, he has broad experience working with international organizations. In his spare time, Hubert is an avid river canoer, skier, cyclist, and hiker.
Working to protect the Adirondacks requires knowledge about the physical environment and a familiarity with the human landscape. Zoë's conservation approach includes safeguarding both the natural resources and local communities in the Adirondacks. Her role as Deputy Director at Paul Smith's College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) is to build strategic partnerships and cultivate opportunities to apply community-based conservation strategies to advance AWI's conservation goals. Before joining AWI, Zoë was the Director of the Adirondack Program for the Wildlife Conservation Society. She serves on the board of Two Countries, One Forest and is core team member of the Adirondack Common Ground Alliance.  In her free time, Zoë is outdoors with her kids and husband, paddling, skiing, and enjoying living in one of the greatest places on earth.

Zoë Smith, Paul Smiths College Adirondack Watershed Institute

Working to protect the Adirondacks requires knowledge about the physical environment and a familiarity with the human landscape. Zoë’s conservation approach includes safeguarding both the natural resources and local communities in the Adirondacks. Her role as Deputy Director at Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) is to build strategic partnerships and cultivate opportunities to apply community-based conservation strategies to advance AWI’s conservation goals. Before joining AWI, Zoë was the Director of the Adirondack Program for the Wildlife Conservation Society. She serves on the board of Two Countries, One Forest and is core team member of the Adirondack Common Ground Alliance.  In her free time, Zoë is outdoors with her kids and husband, paddling, skiing, and enjoying living in one of the greatest places on earth.
Roberta Clowater is one of the founding members of Two Countries, One Forest. She is the Executive Director of the New Brunswick Chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. Roberta has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of New Brunswick, and a Master of Arts degree in Regional Planning and Resource Development from the University of Waterloo. She has worked for the past 26 years in leadership roles for non-government conservation organizations in New Brunswick and is a part-time instructor at the University of New Brunswick’s Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management. She is past-Chair of the New Brunswick government's Protected Natural Areas Provincial Advisory Committee, a member of the Task Force on Forest Diversity and Wood Supply (2005-2009), and a founding member of the New Brunswick Wildlife Council (1997-2000).

Roberta Clowater, New Brunswick Chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Roberta Clowater is one of the founding members of Two Countries, One Forest. She is the Executive Director of the New Brunswick Chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. Roberta has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of New Brunswick, and a Master of Arts degree in Regional Planning and Resource Development from the University of Waterloo. She has worked for the past 26 years in leadership roles for non-government conservation organizations in New Brunswick and is a part-time instructor at the University of New Brunswick’s Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management. She is past-Chair of the New Brunswick government’s Protected Natural Areas Provincial Advisory Committee, a member of the Task Force on Forest Diversity and Wood Supply (2005-2009), and a founding member of the New Brunswick Wildlife Council (1997-2000).
Conrad Reining is Senior Associate Director for Advancement and Administration at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. In this position, he helps the Dean of the Faculty ensure that more than 40 academic departments and programs have the resources necessary to carry out a wide range of research, teaching, and service activities. Between 2001 and 2013, Conrad was the Eastern Program Director for the Wildlands Network, where he was responsible for coordinating conservation planning, outreach, and fundraising for a large portion of eastern North America. As a board member of Two Countries, One Forest (2C1Forest), he supports the development of a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Northern Appalachians. Conrad serves on the executive committee of the Staying Connected Initiative, which is dedicated to conserving critical habitat linkages in the Northern Appalachians. He also manages the Frank and Brinna Sands Foundation, which supports social services, education, health care, and conservation, primarily in New England.

Conrad Reining, Dartmouth College

Conrad Reining is Senior Associate Director for Advancement and Administration at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. In this position, he helps the Dean of the Faculty ensure that more than 40 academic departments and programs have the resources necessary to carry out a wide range of research, teaching, and service activities. Between 2001 and 2013, Conrad was the Eastern Program Director for the Wildlands Network, where he was responsible for coordinating conservation planning, outreach, and fundraising for a large portion of eastern North America. As a board member of Two Countries, One Forest (2C1Forest), he supports the development of a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Northern Appalachians. Conrad serves on the executive committee of the Staying Connected Initiative, which is dedicated to conserving critical habitat linkages in the Northern Appalachians. He also manages the Frank and Brinna Sands Foundation, which supports social services, education, health care, and conservation, primarily in New England.
Nancy works for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation as County Forester in Franklin and Grand Isle Counties. She was a consulting forest in Vermont for 15 years, operating her own consulting firm for 6 of those years. Nancy holds a B.S in Forestry from the University of Vermont (UVM), an M.A in education from UVM, and an M.S. in Plant and Soil Science from Texas A

Nancy Patch, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation

Nancy works for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation as County Forester in Franklin and Grand Isle Counties. She was a consulting forest in Vermont for 15 years, operating her own consulting firm for 6 of those years. Nancy holds a B.S in Forestry from the University of Vermont (UVM), an M.A in education from UVM, and an M.S. in Plant and Soil Science from Texas A&M University-Kingsville. She also served in the Peace Corps (Argentina 1992-94). Nancy was a member of the board of directors for The Vermont Land Trust for nine years, serving as chair for two years. More recently Nancy helped form and continues to serve on the board of Cold Hollow to Canada, a regional conservation partnership in the Green Mountain Linkage area of the Northern Forest.
Margo Morrison is the Director of Conservation with the Nature Conservancy of Canada's (NCC's) Atlantic Region and has been with NCC for almost 15 years. NCC is Canada’s largest national land conservation organization. Since 1962, NCC has helped to protect 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares) across the country.  Margo oversees the land securement, conservation science and stewardship activities in the Atlantic Region, with the goal of protecting our region’s most significant landscapes and species.    

 

Prior to joining NCC, Margo worked with the Department of Natural Resources in the Fish and Wildlife Branch with the Habitat Program. Margo was involved in setting the habitat objectives for forest management plans on Crown land.  

 

Margo graduated from the University of New Brunswick with a degree of Forestry and Environmental Management with a minor in Geographic Information Systems in 2003. She presently resides in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada with her husband Scott and two daughters, Abigale and Leah. During any spare time, the Morrison family loves heading to the family cottage along the shores of the Saint John River and either swimming, sailing, fishing, hiking, taking pictures or camping out under the stars.

Margo Morrison, Nature Conservancy of Canada Atlantic Region

Margo Morrison is the Director of Conservation with the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Atlantic Region and has been with NCC for almost 15 years. NCC is Canada’s largest national land conservation organization. Since 1962, NCC has helped to protect 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares) across the country.  Margo oversees the land securement, conservation science and stewardship activities in the Atlantic Region, with the goal of protecting our region’s most significant landscapes and species.    Prior to joining NCC, Margo worked with the Department of Natural Resources in the Fish and Wildlife Branch with the Habitat Program. Margo was involved in setting the habitat objectives for forest management plans on Crown land.  Margo graduated from the University of New Brunswick with a degree of Forestry and Environmental Management with a minor in Geographic Information Systems in 2003. She presently resides in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada with her husband Scott and two daughters, Abigale and Leah. During any spare time, the Morrison family loves heading to the family cottage along the shores of the Saint John River and either swimming, sailing, fishing, hiking, taking pictures or camping out under the stars.